Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering @UNT

Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering has been approved by THECB!

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is proud to announce their latest degree offering – Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering.  

Our new Ph.D. program offers two tracks: a traditional research track that will help you progress toward your academic career goal and a one-of-a-kind healthcare start-up management track in collaboration with the G. Brint Ryan College of Business. High-achieving students may apply with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering.

For more information about the program and to learn how to register, please look at the BMEN Website.

New publication: Biocompatibility and thermoplastic formability of Pt-based metallic glasses

Big thanks to Shweta Jagdale and Dr. Golden Kumar from the Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Lab at UT Dallas for allowing us to be part of this collaborative effort on biocompatibility and thermoplastic formability of Pt-based metallic glasses!

Great work Qichan on the biocompatibility part of this research.

Abstract

Pt-based metallic glasses are considered for biomedical applications, but the presence of Ni poses the cytotoxicity concerns. Here, we compare the in vitro cell response and thermoplastic formability of Ni-free and Ni-containing Pt-based metallic glasses. Three glass forming compositions, Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5, Pt58.7Cu20.3Ag1P20, and Pt57Cu23P20 were investigated. The Ni-free Pt-Cu-Ag-P metallic glass combines the best combination of biocompatibility and thermoplastic forming.

You want to read more? The full publication can be found here:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167577X21005668

First paper!

Congratulations to Qichan for her first paper with our lab!

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Overview of MMP-13 as a Promising Target for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and chronic inflammation of surrounding tissues. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) is the primary MMP involved in cartilage degradation through its particular ability to cleave type II collagen. Hence, it is an attractive target for the treatment of OA. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of OA initiation and progression remain elusive, and, currently, there are no interventions available to restore degraded cartilage. This review fully illustrates the involvement of MMP-13 in the initiation and progression of OA through the regulation of MMP-13 activity at the molecular and epigenetic levels, as well as the strategies that have been employed against MMP-13. The aim of this review is to identify MMP-13 as an attractive target for inhibitor development in the treatment of OA.

https://www.mdpi.com/992836

It is also the first paper from our lab in 2021 🙂

Congrats grad!

Congratulation to all May 2020 graduates from UNT! We are so proud of you and wish you all the best for your future 🙂

Graduates from Ecker Lab are:

  • Lauren Adegoke
  • Nicholas Johnson
  • George Sarkodie

This is a list of all graduates from the College of Engineering:

We know this year’s a bit different, but that shouldn’t stop us from celebrating.

Share a picture or video of yourself on Twitter, and we’ll RT it. Share a photo or video on Instagram, and we’ll include it in our stories. And share it with us on Facebook, and we’ll add you to the 2020 Graduating Class album.

Just tag @UNTEngineering with #UNTGrad20 on any one of our channels. It’s that easy.

We ❤️ you and all you’ve accomplished. Let us share it with the world.

https://engineering.unt.edu/students/2020-graduation

Special Issue

I am delighted to announce to be the guest editor for the Special Issue “Highly Stretchable Electrode Arrays: Development and Applications”

I am looking forward to your submissions!

George was elected to be the new Vice-Chair of SEDS USA

We are so happy to announce that George Sarkodie was elected to be the next Vice Chair of SEDS USA – Students for the Exploration and Development of Space.

What is SEDS all about?

“Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) is a 501(c)3 non-profit that empowers young people to participate and make an impact in space exploration. SEDS helps students develop their technical and leadership skills by providing opportunities to manage and participate in national projects as well as to attend conferences, publish their work, and develop their professional network, in order to help students become more effective in their present and future careers in industry, academia, government, and education.” (SEDS website)

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George wants to use this opportunity and platform to bring change and inspiration to students all across the world.

We are so proud of you! Well deserved!

Grand Opening of the Biomedical Engineering Building

On August 29, 2019, we had our grand opening of the new Biomedical Engineering Building here at Discovery Park with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The 26,250-square-foot building houses open concept labs and classrooms to create a transparent and collaborative environment for cutting-edge research and learning. The $12.6 million biomedical engineering building provides faculty and students with modern classrooms, research labs, facilities for microscopy, cell culture and optics as well as teaching labs and a senior design lab.

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